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Reading – Extension task

17 Sep

READING BEE

This small group reading task is a nice little extension activity to see if students can follow instructions and directions. It’s a map and a list of facilities and where they’re located to test student comprehension and team work for correct identification.

I’ve laminated the blank plan so the students can use dry wipe pens to identify areas and not get mad if they’ve made a mistake as it’s easily rubbed off. It also encourages discussion as the instructions aren’t entirely clear. Thanks to Jackie Hutchinson for this resource, the answers are also included.

READING FOR INFORMATION SPORTS HALL JH

READING FOR INFORMATION SPORTS HALL ANSWERS JH

Image: http://www.freedigitalphotos.net

Wikipedia writing task

19 Aug

QUESTION MARK

This great activity encourages writing through the use of recognisable social media courtesy of Luke Meddings on BBC Teaching English (extract below).

This is an activity ‘about’ the internet, but it doesn’t start online. In fact it has to start offline: the idea is that students try and predict the first paragraph of the Wikipedia entry for their town, region or country.

Preparation
Before the lesson, make sure there is a Wikipedia entry in English for the place you’re going to talk about. During the lesson, access to the internet in class is useful, though not essential; you could use print outs at the comparison stage.

Procedure
Ask students to work in pairs or groups. What facts would they include? What are the important things to say it? One way to do an activity like this is to start with students working on their own, then ask them to compare with a partner and agree a shared text, then get into small groups and make a further draft. They can share these drafts before the next stage.
If you can go online, do it now. Invite the learners to compare their own entries with the actual Wikipedia entry. What similarities and/or differences do they notice? What language features do they recognise in the ‘official’ text? What are the organising principles behind the Wikipedia entries?
If you like, you can add an element of competition by awarding a point for everything they correctly predict.

Extension
Change the task to focus on different Wikipedia entries. In each case the task is the same, to predict and compare their paragraph with the real thing. For example:
a favourite singer
an actor
a sportsman or football team
a character in a film or story

Ask them to write an ‘imaginary’ Wikipedia entry. These can’t be compared with a real one, but can be displayed around the class or shared on a blog. Here are some ideas for an imaginary Wikipedia entry:
my family
someone they know and admire (this could be someone in their family, or a friend)
me at the age of 50 – all the things I’ve achieved

Image: http://www.freedigitalphotos.net
Source: http://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/activities/my-wikipedia

Bad manners project

16 Aug

GIRL HOLDING PENCIL

A nice project with foundation resources from Carel Press which involves reading, writing, speaking and listening.  The students can review an informational poster related to bad manners and then discuss what they have read and if it applies to them.

Students are then asked to answer some questions to determine they have read the piece thoroughly then create a poster and write a piece about who inspires them as a role model.  There’s lots of opportunities here for small group work and creativity.  Thanks to Jackie Hutchinson for this resource.

BAD MANNERS TEXT JH BAD MANNERS TASK JH BAD MANNERS ANSWERS JH

Text source: http://www.carelpress.com

Inclusion poster

15 Aug

image

An informative set of resources showing what inclusion is from the Tes Blog.  You could use the poster/Powerpoint as a point for discussion and ask students what they think the points mean and if they are valid or get the students to make a poster stating what inclusion means to them and display it somewhere prominently in the classroom.

WHAT IS INCLUSION POSTER

Source: http://bit.ly/14WvnMO

A good week lesson resources

11 Aug

A GOOD WEEK LIGHTBULB

Fabulous resources from http://www.agoodweek.com related to inspiring students to engage with others and make a positive difference through a variety of activities. One activity is to write ideas on the cards (image above) and could be used at the end of a session to show what students have learnt then challenge them further to add what impact it will have. There are many more resources to encourage students to think further about what they do and how they can drive change, please take a look.

The ethos of ‘a good week’ is taken from their website (below):

A Good Week is a global celebration of all the Good that happens in the world.
The world will come together to shine a spotlight on the people, communities and businesses making the world a healthier and happier place. We’ll be encouraging people to think about how they can improve their lives and, with partner organisations, support them to access opportunities to make their ideas happen.

A GOOD DAY AT SCHOOL RESOURCES

Source: http://www.agoodweek.com/resources/

Active review of learning

19 Jul

image

 

Thanks again to Jackie Hutchinson for providing this engaging and competitive summative assessment.

Number of people: any group size up to 40 max.

Materials: Coloured pens and flipchart paper

Time: 10-15 minutes

Overview: A high-energy physical review – good for engaging unmotivated students.

Directions:

  1. Divide the class into three or four teams, depending on numbers, of up to ten students.
  2. Give each team a different coloured marker (red/blue/green/black) and get teams to think of a team name for comedy value.3.
  3. Put three or four pieces of flipchart paper on the board/wall with team names written at the top in the relevant colour.
  4. One person from each team starts by writing on their team paper one thing they have learned during the lesson. They come back, hand the pen to another person in their team and then the second person writes something they have learned (It must be different from the previous ones). The winning team is the one with the most new things learned.

NB: Teacher can differentiate by making sure less able learners are at the front of each line and more able towards the end – it obviously gets harder to think of additional facts as the game progresses.

Image: http://www.freedigitalimages.net

REVIEW RELAY SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT TASK

Text speak recap task

18 Jul

GIRL WITH PHONE

Thanks to Jackie Hutchinson for this recap and mini assessment task that uses a bit of innovative practice when students find it impossible to resist using their phones.

Overview: Very simple review which will appeal to your students – especially those who use their mobile phones in class.

Number of people: any group size.

Materials: None – they bring it!

Time: 10 minutes at the end of class (summative assessment).

Directions:

  1. Students work independently, writing two or three main points learned during the lesson using TEXT shortcuts.
  2. Pick some of the most creative attempts and have students write them up on the board or add to a continual ‘What we are learning’ display using correct English language.
  3. Group discuss language use and language evolvement plus suitability for professional use.

Image: http://www.freedigitalphotos.net

TEXT SPEAK SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT TASK